Archivi tag: 경기도출장샵

On Jan

Red Cross spokesman Pericles Jean-Baptiste says the children were in the school when a wall collapsed at about noon Monday in the city of Cap-Haitien, about 80 miles (130 kilometers) north of the country’s quake-shattered capital.

7 months agoComplete Coverage: Devastation in Haiti Haiti Quake: How You can Help

Officials say the area saw heavy rains and a small earthquake overnight, though the cause of the collapse is not immediately clear. The quake was not recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey.

A magnitude-7 quake on Jan. 12 near Port-au-Prince killed roughly 200,000 people.

Schools reopened last week in the north but they remain closed in the capital.

The school collapse comes amid widespread concerns in Haiti about the structural integrity of houses and 경기도출장샵 buildings damaged by the quake, especially given the risk of further aftershocks. Many stand empty as even as quake victims desperate for shelter crowd the streets.

At least 54 aftershocks have shuddered through Haiti’s shattered capital since a Jan. 12 quake killed more than 200,000 people. They have toppled weakened buildings faster than demolition crews can get to them, sending up new clouds of choking dust. On Monday, three children were killed when a school collapsed in the northern city of Cap-Haitien. It wasn’t clear what caused the collapse, which occurred after a late-night tremor and heavy rains.

“I tried sleeping in the house for a night, but an aftershock came and I ran outside,” said Louise Lafonte, 36, who beds down with her family of five in a tent beside her seemingly intact concrete house. “I’m not going inside until the ground calms down.”

That may be awhile. Seismologists say more, damaging aftershocks are likely and there’s even a chance of another large quake following quickly after the initial catastrophe in the capital of 3 million people.

In 1751, a large quake hit the island that Haiti shares with the Dominican Republic. About a month later, another one destroyed Port-au-Prince.

A magnitude-7.4 quake that killed more than 18,000 people in northwestern Turkey in 1999 was followed three months later by another of magnitude-7.2 only 100 kilometers (60 miles) from the initial epicenter.

“There are many other examples like that of two significant earthquakes following each other,” said Eric Calais, a geophysicist at Purdue University who said he warned the Haitian government two years ago that the country was vulnerable to a major quake.

The prospect of another quake is on the minds of planners trying to rebuild the country and on those trying to prevent more deaths.

U.N. inspectors have advised people to stay away from dozens of structures. On Jan. 26, four people were trapped when a building collapsed on them, and on Feb. 9, a magnitude-4.0 aftershock shook loose debris at a shattered supermarket, trapping several more.

“One of the problems with aftershocks is that lot of buildings are already damaged, so aftershocks can punch above their weight,” said Brian Baptie, a seismologist with the British Geological Survey in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Seismologists say Port-au-Prince was particularly vulnerable due to its population density and shoddy construction.

Haiti’s government on Sunday banned the use of quarry sand in structures, although it is not clear how it will enforce the ban. Engineers say the limestone quarry sand produces brittle concrete easily damaged by quakes.

The U.S. Geological Survey estimated at the end of January that there was a 90-percent likelihood of at least one more magnitude-5 quake in the coming month, a 15 percent likelihood of one of magnitude-6 or greater, and a 2 percent possibility of a shock as great, or bigger, than the Jan. 12 quake.

At least 15 of the aftershocks near the original epicenter have registered at least magnitude-5.

Scientists say the impact of the quake last month may spread far wider.

A magnitude-5.8 earthquake struck off the Cayman Islands two days after the Haiti quake. Last week, a magnitude-5.4 quake jolted eastern Cuba. And Montserrat’s volcano, more than 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) to the east, shot ash some 15 kilometers (nine miles) into the sky during one of its most dramatic events since a 1997 eruption that drove away half the Caribbean island’s population.

“These events we’re seeing might be because of the passage of seismic waves – what we call dynamic triggering – that shake already damaged fault lines in places like Cuba,” Calais said. “The same type of thing could be happening in Montserrat, but it’s very difficult to tell.”

Strong quakes relieve stress along fault lines, but that stress is often shifted elsewhere.

Last month’s earthquake occurred along the east-west Enriquillo Fault, where two pieces of earth’s crust slide by each other in opposite directions like a zipper. Surprisingly, aftershocks haven’t clustered on the Enriquillo, but along what appears to be a previously unidentified separate fault.

Arthur Lerner-Lam of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York said there is a heightened risk of quakes for some time because strong temblors force the Earth to rearrange itself.

Estimating where a major quake may strike is an imprecise science anywhere – and especially in Haiti, which lacks seismometers and has never logged histories of temblors.

That sort of historical record is critical for scientists like Calais, who is advising Haiti’s government and the U.N. and is trying to develop an earthquake hazard map that can be used to mitigate risks for the reconstruction effort.

“We’re half-blind when it comes to Haiti,” Calais said.

L.A. Mayor’s Girlfriend Suspended From Job

However, Mirthala Salinas has only been suspended for two months without pay, and not fired, reports KCBS-TV.

Salinas, 35, was having the relationship with Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa when she announced the news of his separation from his wife of 20 years on the local Telemundo station.

The suspension follows a three-week internal investigation reviewed by executives at Telemundo and parent company NBC Universal. Three Telemundo employees also were disciplined. Findings were reported on the network’s national newscast Thursday night and announced by executives.

“We have determined that, while the content and accuracy of (local affiliate) KVEA’s newscasts were not compromised, our news policy standards with respect to conflict of interest were clearly violated,” Telemundo network president Don Browne said in a statement.

“Her reading of copy during newscasts … regarding the mayor’s separation from his wife was a flagrant violation of these guidelines,” Browne wrote in a separate memo to employees.

A message left with Salinas’ representative Thursday was not returned.

“Now that Telemundo’s internal review has reached a conclusion, it is my hope that we can all move forward,” Villaraigosa said in a statement.

In its newscast, Telemundo reported others disciplined included KVEA news director Al Corral, who was suspended without pay for two months, and the station’s general manager, Manuel Abud, who was removed from his post and will be transferred to a new position still undetermined. Ibra Morales, president of Telemundo stations, will be reprimanded.

In late 2006 Salinas, then the station’s political reporter, and station management agreed that she should be reassigned to a different beat that would not involve reporting on the mayor or city politics, Browne said.

“That decision, consistent with our guidelines, was made on the basis of a friendship that had developed” between Salinas and Villaraigosa, Browne wrote.

A later decision, to move Salinas into a temporary anchor position where she read lead-ins about the mayor and city politics, “conflicted with our guidelines and with management’s prior decision,” wrote Browne.

“The failure to respond appropriately in the following weeks further compounded these errors,” he added.

Salinas was placed on leave July 5 while her employer investigated whether her romantic relationship with Villaraigosa breached journalistic ethics.

The long-rumored affair was acknowledged by Villaraigosa on July 3 after a newspaper story revealed details of the relationship.

Corina Villaraigosa filed for divorce June 12, a day after the mayor told reporters in a City Hall news conference that he took the blame for 부산중구출장샵 his crumbling marriage.

Salinas reported the news of Villaraigosa’s separation on the June 8 newscast of Telemundo’s local station.

“The rumors were true,” is how Salinas led into the story.

“I regret that decisions I have made in my personal life have been a distraction for the city,” the mayor’s statement said Thursday.

That compared with five men who’d played other sports — with no difference in the two groups’ overall rates

In a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and 1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems.

3 months agoNor did they show increased rates of Parkinson’s disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The study used a small group of men, the researchers acknowledged. But, they added, the results are in line with an earlier study that examined men who’d played high school football in the 1940s and 1950s.

“What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports,” said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

That might sound surprising, given evidence that former professional football players can face increased risks of degenerative brain diseases. Autopsies have confirmed cases of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in numerous former National Football League players.

CTE is a progressive brain disease thought to result from repeated head trauma.

But Savica said that pro and college football is “completely different” from the high school level — in intensity, size and speed of the players, and the number of “hits” they take.

Research “clearly attests” to the risk of CTE in at least some former pro and college football players, Savica said.

What’s more, he added, the new findings don’t prove that high school football carries no long-term risks.

Kenneth Podell, director of the Houston Methodist Concussion Center, agreed.

“It’s encouraging that they [the study authors] didn’t see any increased risks, but the findings should be considered preliminary,” said Podell, who was not involved in the research.

Because the study is small, he said, it may have lacked the statistical “power” to detect differences between former football players and other former athletes.

Savica stressed that no one should assume the findings apply to men who played high school football in more recent years.

“That was a different era,” he said, referring to the time period his team studied.

High school players have gotten bigger and faster, Savica said, and there may be more “drive to win at all costs” these days compared with decades ago.

And while there have been advances in protective equipment, he added, that might give some players a “false sense of security” that causes them to be more aggressive, he said.

“You can still get a concussion when you’re wearing a helmet,” Savica said.

Podell agreed that the study findings can’t be extrapolated to younger generations of high school players.

But he also pointed to some things that have changed for the better — particularly in the last decade or so.

Awareness of concussion and its shorter-term dangers has risen, and management of the condition has changed greatly since the era covered in the new study, Podell said.

U.S. states, for example, now have “return to play” laws that typically require players to be immediately removed from the game if a concussion is suspected. And guidelines say that athletes should not return to play until they have a doctor’s approval.

Back in the era that Savica’s team studied, blows to the head were typically brushed off as “getting your bell rung.”

“Maybe the coach would say, ‘How many fingers am I holding up?’ And if you said ‘two,’ you’d go back in the game,” Savica said.

The findings, published online Dec. 12 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, are based on medical records of 296 men who’d played football at one of two Minnesota high schools, and 190 who’d been involved in swimming, basketball and wrestling. All athletes played from 1956 to 1970.

Over time, the researchers found, seven former football players had been diagnosed with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. That compared with five men who’d played other sports — with no difference in the two groups’ overall rates.

Similarly, 부산중구출장샵 three men in each group had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, while no one had an ALS diagnosis.

Some big questions remain, Podell said. One is this: Are there certain people at greater risk of lasting damage from sports-related concussions or repeated knocks to the head?

“That’s something researchers are trying to understand,” he said. “Are there genetic and environmental risk factors that make some people more vulnerable?”

For now, Savica suggested that parents remember that sports — including football — can benefit kids. But they should also guard against the risks, he added.

That, he said, includes knowing the symptoms of concussion, and being sure that the trainers and coaches on the sidelines know how to respond to a possible concussion.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some common concussion symptoms include headache, dizziness, nausea, vision problems, fatigue and confusion.

officials say preserving the country’s churches, artwork and mementos from its slave revolt will be crucial for Haitians’ long-term emotional recovery

“There is a temptation to demolish everything. When the bulldozers come, it’s fatal,” Daniel Elie, director of Haiti’s governmental Institute for the Preservation of National Heritage, told The Associated Press at the Paris headquarters of the U.N. cultural agency.

韩国游-济州-景点-城山日出峰·10<strong data-recalc-dims=11<\/strong>314916″ style=”max-width:400px;float:left;padding:10px 10px 10px 0px;border:0px;”>Keeping survivors alive and building solid shelter for the 1.2 million made homeless by the Jan. 12 quake are the most immediate priorities. But U.N. officials say preserving the country’s churches, artwork and mementos from its slave revolt will be crucial for Haitians’ long-term emotional recovery.

Complete Coverage: Devastation in HaitiHaiti Quake: How You Can Help

Cathedrals and other buildings dating to the 17th century were among those damaged, some reduced to their foundations or a lone crumbling wall. In that state, Elie said, their cultural value isn’t obvious to demolition teams sent to raze neighborhoods, he said.

His agency is compiling lists of buildings that should be protected to send around to other government agencies.

Despite the country’s current administrative disarray, “We must make everyone, everywhere sensitive to this,” he said.

Elie is joining Haiti’s culture and communications minister, Marie-Laurence Jocelyn Lassegue, and 부산중구출장샵 UNESCO officials for talks this week to determine the most urgent needs for restoring damaged historical and cultural sites.

Irina Bokova, director of the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, said the agency has contacted “quite a few donors who have expressed their availability to finance” restoration projects. She would not name them but said it could involve European governments or private donors.

Elie said “the priority of priorities” is restoring the historical center of Jacmel, a 17th- century coastal town once home to wealthy coffee merchants, with a turquoise bay and a serene reputation that attracted tourists and expatriates. About three-quarters of the homes in Jacmel’s downtown were damaged.

“The historical center is the basis of tourism development” as the country tries to recover some semblance of a tourism sector, he said. Haiti wants UNESCO to make Jacmel a World Heritage site.

Lassegue argued that Haitians and their international backers must respect history and culture as they rebuild the nation. “Heritage is so closely linked to national identity,” she said.

UNESCO is also pushing for a ban on international trade in Haitian cultural treasures to prevent pillaging of the nation’s museums in the aftermath of the quake, and international security forces to protect cultural sites.

In one example of global efforts to protect Haitian artworks, French restoration experts will repair an 1822 painting found in the rubble of the Caribbean country’s presidential palace. French firefighters discovered the damaged, ripped painting.

The painting, “Serment des ancetres” (Oath of the Ancestors), by Guillaume Guillon Lethiere, depicts a meeting between two of the fathers of Haitian independence. Haiti won its independence in an 1804 slave revolt against France, defeating Napoleon’s forces.

French President Nicolas Sarkozy is to travel to Haiti on Wednesday – the first ever trip by a French leader to the country.

CTE is a progressive brain disease thought to result from repeated head trauma

3 months agoIn a finding that suggests football used to be a less dangerous sport, a small study shows that men who played in high school in the 1950s and 1960s may not be at increased risk for dementia or memory problems.

Nor did they show increased rates of Parkinson’s disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

The study used a small group of men, the researchers acknowledged. But, they added, the results are in line with an earlier study that examined men who’d played high school football in the 1940s and 1950s.

“What we can say is, for that era, football did not increase the risks of neurodegenerative disease compared with other sports,” said senior researcher Dr. Rodolfo Savica, a neurologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.

That might sound surprising, given evidence that former professional football players can face increased risks of degenerative brain diseases. Autopsies have confirmed cases of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in numerous former National Football League players.

CTE is a progressive brain disease thought to result from repeated head trauma.

But Savica said that pro and college football is “completely different” from the high school level — in intensity, size and speed of the players, and the number of “hits” they take.

Research “clearly attests” to the risk of CTE in at least some former pro and college football players, Savica said.

What’s more, he added, the new findings don’t prove that high school football carries no long-term risks.

Kenneth Podell, director of the Houston Methodist Concussion Center, agreed.

“It’s encouraging that they [the study authors] didn’t see any increased risks, but the findings should be considered preliminary,” said Podell, who was not involved in the research.

Because the study is small, he said, it may have lacked the statistical “power” to detect differences between former football players and other former athletes.

Savica stressed that no one should assume the findings apply to men who played high school football in more recent years.

“That was a different era,” he said, referring to the time period his team studied.

High school players have gotten bigger and 경기도출장샵 faster, Savica said, and there may be more “drive to win at all costs” these days compared with decades ago.

And while there have been advances in protective equipment, he added, that might give some players a “false sense of security” that causes them to be more aggressive, he said.

“You can still get a concussion when you’re wearing a helmet,” Savica said.

Podell agreed that the study findings can’t be extrapolated to younger generations of high school players.

But he also pointed to some things that have changed for the better — particularly in the last decade or so.

Awareness of concussion and its shorter-term dangers has risen, and management of the condition has changed greatly since the era covered in the new study, Podell said.

U.S. states, for example, now have “return to play” laws that typically require players to be immediately removed from the game if a concussion is suspected. And guidelines say that athletes should not return to play until they have a doctor’s approval.

Back in the era that Savica’s team studied, blows to the head were typically brushed off as “getting your bell rung.”

“Maybe the coach would say, ‘How many fingers am I holding up?’ And if you said ‘two,’ you’d go back in the game,” Savica said.

The findings, published online Dec. 12 in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, are based on medical records of 296 men who’d played football at one of two Minnesota high schools, and 190 who’d been involved in swimming, basketball and wrestling. All athletes played from 1956 to 1970.

Over time, the researchers found, seven former football players had been diagnosed with dementia or mild cognitive impairment. That compared with five men who’d played other sports — with no difference in the two groups’ overall rates.

Similarly, three men in each group had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, while no one had an ALS diagnosis.

Some big questions remain, Podell said. One is this: Are there certain people at greater risk of lasting damage from sports-related concussions or repeated knocks to the head?

“That’s something researchers are trying to understand,” he said. “Are there genetic and environmental risk factors that make some people more vulnerable?”

For now, Savica suggested that parents remember that sports — including football — can benefit kids. But they should also guard against the risks, he added.

That, he said, includes knowing the symptoms of concussion, and being sure that the trainers and coaches on the sidelines know how to respond to a possible concussion.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, some common concussion symptoms include headache, dizziness, nausea, vision problems, fatigue and confusion.

“This operation has been done with that in mind,” the top NATO commander, U.S

Taliban fighters stepped up counterattacks Monday against Marines and Afghan soldiers in the militant stronghold of Marjah, slowing the allied advance to a crawl despite Afghan government claims that the insurgents are broken and on the run.

Taliban fighters appeared to be slipping under cover of darkness into compounds already deemed free of weapons and explosives, then opening fire on the Marines from behind U.S. lines.

Also on Monday, NATO said five civilians were accidentally killed and two wounded by an airstrike when they were mistakenly believed to have been planting roadside bombs in Kandahar province, east of the Marjah offensive.

The airstrike happened one day after 12 people, half of them children, were killed by two U.S. missiles that struck a house on the outskirts of Marjah. Afghan officials said Monday that three Taliban fighters were in the house at the time of the attack.

The commander of U.S. forces was quick to apologize, reports CBS News correspondent Mandy Clark.

“When President Karzai approved this operation he gave us very specific guidance, which was to protect the people of Afghanistan, and this operation was done with this in mind,” said Gen. Stanley McChrystal.

Special Report: Afghanistan

The massive offensive involving some 15,000 U.S., Afghan and British troops is the biggest joint operation since the 2001 U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan.

Clark, who is embedded with the U.S. military, reports that Kilo Company have only been able to receive supplies from air. Mine-clearing vehicles being used to reach them have come under direct fire, and that means for now the company is on its own.

On the third day of the main attack on Marjah, Afghan commanders spoke optimistically about progress in the town of about 80,000 people, the linchpin of the Taliban logistical and opium poppy smuggling network in the militant-influenced south.

Brig. Gen. Sher Mohammad Zazai, commander of Afghan troops in the south, told reporters in nearby Lashkar Gah that there had been “low resistance” in the town, adding “soon we will have Marjah cleared of enemies.”

Interior Minister Hanif Atmar said many insurgent fighters had already fled Marjah, possibly heading for Pakistan.

In Marjah, however, there was little sign the Taliban were broken. Instead, small, mobile teams of insurgents repeatedly attacked U.S. and Afghan troops with rocket, rifle and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Insurgents moved close enough to the main road to fire repeatedly at columns of mine-clearing vehicles.

At midday at least six large gunbattles were raging across the town, and helicopter gunships couldn’t cover all the different fighting locations.

Allied officials have reported only two coalition deaths so far – one American and one Briton killed Saturday. There have been no reports of wounded. Afghan officials said at least 27 insurgents have been killed so far in the offensive.

Nonetheless, the harassment tactics and the huge number of roadside bombs, mines and booby traps planted throughout Marjah have succeeded in slowing the movement of allied forces through the town. After daylong skirmishes, some Marine units had barely advanced at all by sundown.

As long as the town remains unstable, NATO officials cannot move to the second phase – restoring Afghan government control and rushing in aid and public services to win over inhabitants who have been living under Taliban rule for years.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai approved the assault on Marjah only after instructing NATO and Afghan commanders to be careful about harming civilians. “This operation has been done with that in mind,” the top NATO commander, U.S. Gen. Stanley McChrystal, said Monday.

Despite those instructions, NATO said two U.S. rockets veered off target by up to 600 yards and slammed into a home Sunday outside Marjah, killing 12 people. Six children were among the dead, a NATO military official confirmed Monday, speaking on condition of anonymity because the information had not been formally released.

In London, Britain’s top military officer, Air Chief Marshal Sir Jock Stirrup, called the missile strike a “very serious setback” to efforts to win the support of local communities, who are from the same Pashtun ethnic group as the Taliban.

“This operation … is not about battling the Taliban. It is about protecting the local population, and you don’t protect them when you kill them,” he said in an interview with the British Broadcasting Corp.

NATO said the Kandahar airstrike was ordered Monday after a joint NATO-Afghan patrol saw people digging along a path “and believed that the individuals” were planting a roadside bomb. When they realized their mistake, troops flew the wounded to a NATO hospital, the statement said.

“We regret this tragic accident and offer our sympathies to the families of those killed and injured,” said Maj. Gen. Michael Regner, the NATO command’s deputy chief of staff for joint operations. “Our combined forces take every precaution to minimize civilian casualties, and we will investigate this incident to determine how this happened.”

Karzai spokesman Waheed Omar said the president “is very upset about what happened” and has been “very seriously conveying his message” of restraint “again and again.”

Appearing on CBS’ “The Early Show” this morning, 경기도출장샵 Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations, said that the military mission of the Obama administration’s new Afghan strategy – clearing the region of militants – can be fulfilled, the longer-term part – helping the Afghans hold and build on it – is more of a question mark.

“The bigger question is whether the Afghans can do their part, and all I would say is history teaches us to be somewhat skeptical,” Haass said.

The main attack began before dawn Saturday when dozens of helicopters dropped hundreds of Marines and Afghan soldiers into the heart of the city. Ground troops began moving just before sunrise, using makeshift bridges to cross the irrigation canals ringing the town because the main bridge was so heavily mined.

Although there was only scattered resistance on the first day, Taliban fighters seem to have regrouped, using hit-and-run tactics to try to prevent the Americans and their Afghan allies from gaining full control of the area.

The Taliban snipers appeared highly skilled at concealing themselves.

“I haven’t seen anything, not one person, not a muzzle flash,” said Richard Knie, of Hudson, Iowa, a former Marine and retired police officer embedded with the Marines as a law enforcement professional. “And I’ve been looking a lot.”

Troops complained that strict rules to protect civilians made it difficult to use enough firepower to stop the attacks.

“I understand the reason behind it, but it’s so hard to fight a war like this,” said Lance Corp. Travis Anderson, 20, from Altoona, Iowa. “They’re using our rules of engagement against us,” he said, adding that his platoon had repeatedly seen men dropping their guns into ditches before walking away to melt among civilians.

“I’m not going inside until the ground calms down.” That may be awhile

Red Cross spokesman Pericles Jean-Baptiste says the children were in the school when a wall collapsed at about noon Monday in the city of Cap-Haitien, about 80 miles (130 kilometers) north of the country’s quake-shattered capital.

Complete Coverage: Devastation in Haiti Haiti Quake: How You can Help

Officials say the area saw heavy rains and a small earthquake overnight, though the cause of the collapse is not immediately clear. The quake was not recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey.

A magnitude-7 quake on Jan. 12 near Port-au-Prince killed roughly 200,000 people.

Schools reopened last week in the north but they remain closed in the capital.

The school collapse comes amid widespread concerns in Haiti about the structural integrity of houses and buildings damaged by the quake, especially given the risk of further aftershocks. Many stand empty as even as quake victims desperate for shelter crowd the streets.

At least 54 aftershocks have shuddered through Haiti’s shattered capital since a Jan. 12 quake killed more than 200,000 people. They have toppled weakened buildings faster than demolition crews can get to them, sending up new clouds of choking dust. On Monday, three children were killed when a school collapsed in the northern city of Cap-Haitien. It wasn’t clear what caused the collapse, which occurred after a late-night tremor and heavy rains.

“I tried sleeping in the house for a night, but an aftershock came and I ran outside,” said Louise Lafonte, 36, who beds down with her family of five in a tent beside her seemingly intact concrete house. “I’m not going inside until the ground calms down.”

That may be awhile. Seismologists say more, damaging aftershocks are likely and there’s even a chance of another large quake following quickly after the initial catastrophe in the capital of 3 million people.

In 1751, a large quake hit the island that Haiti shares with the Dominican Republic. About a month later, another one destroyed Port-au-Prince.

A magnitude-7.4 quake that killed more than 18,000 people in northwestern Turkey in 1999 was followed three months later by another of magnitude-7.2 only 100 kilometers (60 miles) from the initial epicenter.

“There are many other examples like that of two significant earthquakes following each other,” said Eric Calais, a geophysicist at Purdue University who said he warned the Haitian government two years ago that the country was vulnerable to a major quake.

The prospect of another quake is on the minds of planners trying to rebuild the country and on those trying to prevent more deaths.

U.N. inspectors have advised people to stay away from dozens of structures. On Jan. 26, four people were trapped when a building collapsed on them, and on Feb. 9, a magnitude-4.0 aftershock shook loose debris at a shattered supermarket, trapping several more.

“One of the problems with aftershocks is that lot of buildings are already damaged, so aftershocks can punch above their weight,” said Brian Baptie, a seismologist with the British Geological Survey in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Seismologists say Port-au-Prince was particularly vulnerable due to its population density and shoddy construction.

Haiti’s government on Sunday banned the use of quarry sand in structures, although it is not clear how it will enforce the ban. Engineers say the limestone quarry sand produces brittle concrete easily damaged by quakes.

The U.S. Geological Survey estimated at the end of January that there was a 90-percent likelihood of at least one more magnitude-5 quake in the coming month, a 15 percent likelihood of one of magnitude-6 or greater, and 부산중구출장샵 a 2 percent possibility of a shock as great, or bigger, than the Jan. 12 quake.

At least 15 of the aftershocks near the original epicenter have registered at least magnitude-5.

Scientists say the impact of the quake last month may spread far wider.

A magnitude-5.8 earthquake struck off the Cayman Islands two days after the Haiti quake. Last week, a magnitude-5.4 quake jolted eastern Cuba. And Montserrat’s volcano, more than 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) to the east, shot ash some 15 kilometers (nine miles) into the sky during one of its most dramatic events since a 1997 eruption that drove away half the Caribbean island’s population.

“These events we’re seeing might be because of the passage of seismic waves – what we call dynamic triggering – that shake already damaged fault lines in places like Cuba,” Calais said. “The same type of thing could be happening in Montserrat, but it’s very difficult to tell.”

Strong quakes relieve stress along fault lines, but that stress is often shifted elsewhere.

Last month’s earthquake occurred along the east-west Enriquillo Fault, where two pieces of earth’s crust slide by each other in opposite directions like a zipper. Surprisingly, aftershocks haven’t clustered on the Enriquillo, but along what appears to be a previously unidentified separate fault.

Arthur Lerner-Lam of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in New York said there is a heightened risk of quakes for some time because strong temblors force the Earth to rearrange itself.

Estimating where a major quake may strike is an imprecise science anywhere – and especially in Haiti, which lacks seismometers and has never logged histories of temblors.

That sort of historical record is critical for scientists like Calais, who is advising Haiti’s government and the U.N. and is trying to develop an earthquake hazard map that can be used to mitigate risks for the reconstruction effort.

“We’re half-blind when it comes to Haiti,” Calais said.

Although Wonder has given numerous performances worldwide, his last full-scale tour in the U.S

7 months agoThe 57-year-old singer made the announcement at an outdoor performance in Los Angeles on Thursday.

“A Wonder Summer’s Night” will feature 13 concerts from Aug. 23 to Sept. 20 in eight states. Stops in California include San Diego, Lake Tahoe, Concord, Santa Barbara, Saratoga and Los Angeles. Other cities include Portland, 부산중구출장샵 Ore.; Woodinville, Wash.; Chicago; Detroit; Atlanta; and Baltimore. The final concert will be in Boston.

Although Wonder has given numerous performances worldwide, his last full-scale tour in the U.S. was in 1995.

The Motown legend has some two dozen Grammy Awards and dozens of hits. His song “I Just Called to Say I Love You,” featured in the movie “The Woman in Red,” won the Academy Award for best original song in 1985.

But in March, The New York Times published an editorial by Nicholas Kristof on the genocide in Darfur, with horrifying photographs of men, women and children who had been slaughtered by militias controlled by the Sudanese government

In early 2005, they were finishing “The Trials of Darryl Hunt,” a documentary about a black man wrongly convicted of the rape and murder of a white woman. But in March, The New York Times published an editorial by Nicholas Kristof on the genocide in Darfur, with horrifying photographs of men, women and children who had been slaughtered by militias controlled by the Sudanese government. An American ex-Marine named Brian Steidle, who had spent six months working as a peacekeeper for the African Union, had taken the photos.

2 years agoThe result is “The Devil Came On Horseback,” which opened in New Yorkthis week and will open in more cities around the country in the nexttwo months.

With Steidle as guide, the film takes audiences on a journey that is at times almost unbearable. Villages are burned; the bodies of girls raped and murdered are strewn about a hot, dry schoolyard. Steidle, a trained Marine, feels impotent. Focusing his binoculars on militias burning a village, he says in the film that he wishes he had “a scope instead of a camera” so that he might protect people. But his mandate as a peacekeeper does not allow that.

The film inter-cuts news footage and photographs taken during Steidle’s return trip to Africa, camera crew in tow, where he interviews Darfur refugees living in camps in eastern Chad, along the Sudanese border. The refugees are personable, open and willing to talk despite the personal danger if the government learns of their candidness about the killings. (Steidle was not only unable to obtain a visa to enter Sudan, he was on a government watch list and feared for his safety.)

“The Devil Came on Horseback” (a rough translation of “Janjaweed,” the name given the Arab militias terrorizing and slaughtering the people of Darfur, many of them black Africans) is the first feature to be released about Darfur in the U.S.

Like the spate of films about the Rwandan genocide (“Hotel Rwanda,” “God Sleeps In Rwanda,” “Sometimes in April,” “Gacaca: Living Together in Rwanda?”), it promises to be one of several. This fall, “Darfur Now,” narrated by Don Cheadle, is scheduled for release; it focuses on six individuals (including a refugee woman, a lawyer from The Hague, and a United Nations worker) struggling to help in Darfur. A documentary by Academy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker Edet Belzberg is still in production.

Sundberg and Stern did not accompany Steidle to Chad for “Devil”: they sent a director 부산중구출장샵 of photography and field producer named Jerry Risius.

“I have to say I’m a veteran DP, and I’ve been all over the world,” said Risius, “and this is the grimmest place I’ve ever been. There were teenage gangs running rampant, truckloads of eight to 12 kids dressed in fatigues, holding what looked like a quiver of arrows, like William Tell. Except they weren’t arrows, they were RPGs, rocket-propelled grenades.”

Steidle and Risius visited sprawling refugee camps in eastern Chad, some with 80,000 people living in one camp, and found “complete and utter feelings of hopelessness,” said Risius. “There was not one person we met who had not been directly affected by the violence.” (Estimates of the number of people killed in Darfur range from 200,000 to 400,000, while some 2.5 million have been displaced.)

But for Risius, it was not the fear or the harsh living conditions that were the most difficult aspects of working on “The Devil Came on Horseback.”

The people we interviewed, said Risius, “had so little, but they gave so much. They opened up their lives and shared their stories. Everybody would be invited in for tea, for whatever they had. It was never very much, and maybe the next day they wouldn’t be able to eat. But they would serve us, a group of three or four.”

“The hardest part,” he said, “was leaving–leaving a place you know is in dire straits, hoping that the movie will raise consciousness.”By Nancy Ramsey for CBSNews.com

She would not name them but said it could involve European governments or private donors

“There is a temptation to demolish everything. When the bulldozers come, it’s fatal,” Daniel Elie, director of Haiti’s governmental Institute for the Preservation of National Heritage, told The Associated Press at the Paris headquarters of the U.N. cultural agency.

Keeping survivors alive and building solid shelter for the 1.2 million made homeless by the Jan. 12 quake are the most immediate priorities. But U.N. officials say preserving the country’s churches, artwork and mementos from its slave revolt will be crucial for Haitians’ long-term emotional recovery.

Complete Coverage: Devastation in HaitiHaiti Quake: How You Can Help

Cathedrals and other buildings dating to the 17th century were among those damaged, some reduced to their foundations or a lone crumbling wall. In that state, Elie said, their cultural value isn’t obvious to demolition teams sent to raze neighborhoods, he said.

His agency is compiling lists of buildings that should be protected to send around to other government agencies.

Despite the country’s current administrative disarray, “We must make everyone, everywhere sensitive to this,” he said.

Elie is joining Haiti’s culture and communications minister, Marie-Laurence Jocelyn Lassegue, and UNESCO officials for talks this week to determine the most urgent needs for restoring damaged historical and cultural sites.

Irina Bokova, director of the U.N. Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, said the agency has contacted “quite a few donors who have expressed their availability to finance” restoration projects. She would not name them but said it could involve European governments or private donors.

Elie said “the priority of priorities” is restoring the historical center of Jacmel, a 17th- century coastal town once home to wealthy coffee merchants, with a turquoise bay and a serene reputation that attracted tourists and expatriates. About three-quarters of the homes in Jacmel’s downtown were damaged.

“The historical center is the basis of tourism development” as the country tries to recover some semblance of a tourism sector, he said. Haiti wants UNESCO to make Jacmel a World Heritage site.

Lassegue argued that Haitians and their international backers must respect history and culture as they rebuild the nation. “Heritage is so closely linked to national identity,” she said.

UNESCO is also pushing for a ban on international trade in Haitian cultural treasures to prevent pillaging of the nation’s museums in the aftermath of the quake, and international security forces to protect cultural sites.

In one example of global efforts to protect Haitian artworks, French restoration experts will repair an 1822 painting found in the rubble of the Caribbean country’s presidential palace. French firefighters discovered the damaged, 부산중구출장샵 ripped painting.

The painting, “Serment des ancetres” (Oath of the Ancestors), by Guillaume Guillon Lethiere, depicts a meeting between two of the fathers of Haitian independence. Haiti won its independence in an 1804 slave revolt against France, defeating Napoleon’s forces.

French President Nicolas Sarkozy is to travel to Haiti on Wednesday – the first ever trip by a French leader to the country.