Archivi tag: 전주 안마

Yanukovych went ahead and declared victory, but his opponent Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, a leader of Orange forces, rejected the exit poll data and said Sunday’s race was too close to call

Yanukovych went ahead and declared victory, but his opponent Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, a leader of Orange forces, rejected the exit poll data and said Sunday’s race was too close to call.

“It is too soon to draw any conclusions,” she said, urging supporters to fight for every ballot.

Ukraine’s Central Election Commission reported early Monday that opposition leader Yanukovych was leading Tymoshenko by 51.3 percent to 43.3 percent with 27.4 percent of the vote counted.

The National Election Poll exit survey predicted that after the count, Yanukovych would capture 48.5 percent of the vote to 45.7 percent for Tymoshenko, with other voters mostly choosing “Against all.” The 2.8 percentage point gap is only slightly larger than the NEP’s margin of error of plus or minus 2.5 percent.

The NEP poll initially showed Yanukovych with a 3.2 percentage point lead, but the later released revised figures. All other major exit polls had Yanukovych winning, some by larger margins.

The race narrowed sharply from the first round vote on Jan. 17, when Yanukovych held a 10 percent lead.

At the Yanukovych camp, top party officials broke into rapturous applause as they heard the exit polls announced, and Anna German, deputy head of Yanukovych’s Party of Regions, called on Tymoshenko to concede.

“The first rule for a true democrat is to accept defeat when that is the will of the people,” she said. “It is now Yulia Tymoshenko’s responsibility to do that.”

Tymoshenko has vowed to challenge a vote she claims was rigged by in Yanukovych’s favor, as it was in the 2004 elections that set off the Orange Revolution. After weeks of demonstrations, a court threw out the results of that 2000 vote contest and Yanukovych lost a court-ordered revote to Orange forces

Tymoshenko’s campaign chief Alexander Turchinov insisted Sunday there was evidence of fraud. “Intrigue still remains in place, we remain certain,” he said.

But Matyas Eorsi, head of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe’s election observation mission, called the balloting “calm” and “professional” and said there was no evidence the vote had been stolen.

“We are 100 percent sure that this election was legitimate,” Eorsi said. “All the international community, and even more important, the Ukrainian public can accept this result.”

A preliminary report by international monitors is expected later Monday.

Mikhail Okhendovsky, a member of Ukraine’s Central Election Commission, said the board had no evidence of large scale falsification but expects that the loser will challenge the results in court anyway.

“In keeping with the traditions of Ukrainian elections, the loser never accepts defeat,” he said before the polls closed.

The Central Election Commission projected the turnout among Ukraine’s 37 million voters at about 70 percent, 3.2 percentage points higher than the Jan. 17 first-round vote in which 18 candidates competed.

Early figures showed a heavier turnout in Yanukovych’s strongholds in Ukraine’s Russian-speaking east than in Tymoshenko’s districts in the country’s Ukrainian-speaking west.

Tymoshenko’s impassioned leadership of the 2004 Orange protests made her an international celebrity, and she fought hard in recent weeks to rekindle the heady emotions those days. At one point she debated an empty lectern to dramatize her opponent’s refusal to debate her.

She sought to depict herself as a populist whose appeal crossed Ukraine’s east-west divide but she bore the scars of five years of political battles with Yanukovych and her sometime Orange ally, outgoing President Viktor Yushchenko, and has struggled to cope with Ukraine’s severe economic crisis.

Ukraine has been among the hardest-hit nations in the global credit crunch. Its currency crashed in 2008, wiping out almost half of people’s savings, and the International Monetary Fund had to step in with a $16.4 billion bailout. GDP plunged more than 14 percent in 2009 and the country is expected to have only anemic growth this year, according to the World Bank.

As the election approached, Yanukovych, awkward when speaking in public, tread carefully, sticking mostly with photo opportunities and bland statements to try to hang onto his lead.

He would not be drawn into a Russia-versus-West debate, and pledged to balance ties between Ukraine’s diverse neighbors.

“Ukraine will never be a friend with Russia at the expense of Europe, or Europe at the expense of Russia,” said Boris Kolesnikov, deputy leader of Yanukovych’s Party of Regions. “That will guide the foreign policy under the Yanukovych presidency.”

But Yanukovych represents the hopes of many Russian speakers in eastern Ukraine, who feel they have been relegated to second-class status behind the urban elite who favored the Orange reform forces.

Yanukovych supporters have been camped out in front of the Central Election Commission headquarters and other key points in Kiev in an apparent effort to prevent Tymoshenko supporters from staging mass demonstrations like those of the Orange revolt.

If Yanukovych wins, it will be an impressive reversal of fortune. During the 2004 protests, foes cast him as a Kremlin lackey. But he battled back, serving for a time as prime minister under his main Orange adversary, 부천 마사지 Yushchenko.

He gained ground as voters said they were weary of broken promises, a dysfunctional economy and political chaos under the Orange government.

Casting his ballot in Kiev, once an Orange bastion, Yanukovych said the election would mark the “first step in overcoming the crisis.”

“The people of Ukraine deserve a better life, so I voted for positive changes, stability and a strong Ukraine,” he said.

Tymoshenko voted in her hometown, the industrial center of Dnipropetrovsk, in Yanukovych’s stronghold of eastern Ukraine.

“I voted for a new Ukraine — a beautiful and European Ukraine — and for people to live happily. I will serve Ukraine with all my heart,” Tymoshenko said, standing next to her husband.

Sunday’s vote may shift the balance of power in Ukraine, but it will not heal the country’s deep divisions.

“I am voting against the return of our Soviet past,” 40-year-old businessman Vladimir Khivrenko said at a polling station near the Maidan, the central square in Kiev, the capital. “Tymoshenko has promised us a new path to Europe, and I believe her.”

Tatyana Volodaschuk, 60, said she was sick of political uncertainty.

“I want stability and order,” she said. “Yanukovych offers us the guarantee of a normal life.”

Haiti Quake: Behind the Scenes of CBS’ Coverage

I had just returned from Wilmington, Delaware aboard Air Force One with President Obama. The president and various members of his Cabinet along with members of Congress had traveled to attend a funeral service for 대전 안마 Vice President Biden’s mother. Within an hour of our return, hundreds of thousands of others would soon be mourned. The earthquake struck Port-au-Prince Haiti just before 5:00 p.m.

No one knew just how extensive the damage in Haiti was but this was a powerful earthquake. The first thing that came to mind at our CBS bureau was our colleague Frank Thorpe and his wife. Frank had just quit CBS a couple of weeks earlier to join his wife, who worked with an aid organization in Haiti, the poorest country in the western hemisphere. We soon learned his wife was trapped in a collapsed building. She communicated for help with her cell phone, but Frank was no where to be found. She was rescued hours later and Frank was located in another part of Haiti where he was safe. They were the lucky ones.

Immigration Minister Eric Besson, who initiated the debate, submitted proposals based on the 350 local meetings held around France since early November

Immigration Minister Eric Besson, who initiated the debate, submitted proposals based on the 350 local meetings held around France since early November.

It was not clear whether any firm steps would be taken after the government meeting. Besson said Friday that several concrete measures on better integrating immigrants can be expected, and that his proposed initiatives also concern fighting discrimination and building a European identity.

French newspapers reported that among the proposals being discussed Monday are a special oath for new French citizens and a “young citizen’s card” for 대전 마사지 schoolchildren.

The national identity debates often focused on France’s growing immigrant population, and racist comments occasionally popped up on the interactive Immigration Ministry Web site dedicated to the debate, though were quickly removed.

The debate has divided public opinion in France, with some critics claiming it was a ploy by the governing conservative party for more extreme right votes before March regional elections. Numerous intellectuals have opposed it and, minus a few exceptions, the rival Socialist party refused to participate.

The meetings in towns and cities around France coincided with a debate on whether to ban the face-covering Muslim veil, a subject that overlaps with immigration issues.

Prime Minister Francois Fillon has said the national discussion on France’s identity was “perfectly necessary” and now wants the full government to weigh in on the results.

“Every minister must say what he thinks of the debate and what he thinks of the proposals,” Fillon said last week on Europe-1 radio. They will be called on to “select those which merit being put into place and which justify rules or laws,” he said.

A poll published Feb. 1 by Obea-Infraforces showed that more than one French in two were critical of the debate and nearly 62 percent said it did not help them “define what it is to be French.”

However, Besson justified the debate with another poll, conducted for the Immigration Ministry and made public Friday, that showed that 74 percent of those polled think France’s national identity is weakening, with 30 percent attributing that to immigration and 18 percent to cultural and ethnic issues.

While 75 percent of those polled for the ministry said they were proud or very proud of being French, a full 25 percent were not particularly proud.

The poll for the ministry by the TNS-Sofres firm consulted 1,000 people, the same number as in the previous poll. Margins of error were not provided but in a poll of that size it would be plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Besson wants to continue the debate, perhaps in a different form, through the end of the year.

It is not clear exactly what information other than location that law enforcement gleaned from its use of a Stingray targeting Cohen

The FBI wanted Michael Cohen’s cellphones, but knew they couldn’t be found at his home. The problem: Cohen and his family had moved into a hotel while renovating their apartment.

The solution, on April 8, 2018, was to use a controversial surveillance technology to determine his exact location: Room 1728 at the Loews Regency Hotel.

An FBI special agent wrote in an affidavit unsealed Tuesday that federal agents “sought and obtained authority to employ an electronic technique, commonly known as ‘triggerfish,’ to determine the locations” of Cohen’s two iPhones.

Federal agents later obtained a warrant to retrieve the phones from the room. A court-ordered Special Master later determined that federal agents could review the vast majority of nearly 300,000 files on the two phones, as well as an iPad obtained in the search.

Triggerfish devices — often referred to as Stingrays — mimic cellphone towers, allowing them to pinpoint a phone’s location, sometimes even before it makes a call or text.

It is not clear exactly what information other than location that law enforcement gleaned from its use of a Stingray targeting Cohen. The devices also capable of collecting the calls, text messages and even the emails sent to and from phones.

And because they act as cell towers, they don’t just collect information from the targets of investigations. Stingrays are capable of taking in information from entire neighborhoods, which is why civil liberties groups have for years objected to their use.

The devices are made by defense contractor 대구 마사지 Harris Corporation, and its patents indicate Stingrays and similar devices have been used for about two decades, though law enforcement rarely acknowledges their use.

The government has even withdrawn charges against criminal defendants rather than turning over information to defense teams about the Stingray, according to a 2017 policy analysis by the Cato Institute, a libertarian think tank.

As a result, it’s not clear just how widespread use of the devices is. In a November 2018 report, the ACLU cataloged Stingray use by 75 agencies in 27 states and the District of Columbia, but that list is almost certainly incomplete. The ACLU found 14 federal agencies that use the devices, but does not currently include one identified by CBS News: the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

In response to a 2016 Freedom of Information Act request filed by CBS News, the agency wrote it could not “disclose techniques and procedures for law enforcement investigation and prosecutions.”

and its allies were “welcome to the mine fields” of Marjah, but that victory there would not defeat the radical Islamic movement

Aknond claimed between 1,000 and 1,500 Taliban fighters were laying wait in Marjah for 전주 안마 the onslaught.

The commander said the U.S. and its allies were “welcome to the mine fields” of Marjah, but that victory there would not defeat the radical Islamic movement. “There are dozens of districts like Marjah,” he told CBS News.

Someone could have gotten killed or injured

Richie, the 25-year-old daughter of pop singer Lionel Richie, was subdued and somber as she was lectured about her driving. She entered court on the arm of boyfriend Joel Madden.

Richie, who’s rumored to be pregnant but has not confirmed it, wore a loose-fitting, knee-length black dress and spiked heels. She stood before the judge and softly answered “guilty” when asked how she pleaded to the misdemeanor charge. She initially pleaded not guilty in February.

“You are not to drive with any measurable amount of alcohol or drugs in your system,” Lubell told her. “You are not to drive without a driver’s license.”

He said the state Department of Motor Vehicles would decide whether to suspend her license.

“You are very lucky that no one was hurt of killed as the result of this incident,” Lubell said.

Richie was arrested early Dec. 11 after witnesses reported seeing her black Mercedes-Benz sport utility vehicle headed the wrong way on a freeway in Burbank.

The California Highway Patrol said they found her parked in the car pool lane.

Richie told authorities she had smoked marijuana and taken the prescription painkiller Vicodin, a CHP officer said at the time.

No drugs were found on her or in the car.

Lubell warned Richie of the dangers of driving under the influence and 천안 마사지 said: “The facts of this case, as the court knows it, is pretty scary. Someone could have gotten killed or injured. The court does not want anything to happen to you.

“If you continue to drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol and someone gets killed, you can be charged with murder, not manslaughter.

“I hope that never, ever happens.”

He said such a murder charge would come under a specific legal provision because she now has two convictions, the first one in June 2003 when she was convicted for driving under the influence of alcohol. The 2003 conviction made her eligible for a sentence of 90 days to a year in jail.

The reality TV star’s lawyer, Shawn Chapman Holly, acknowledged to the court that the plea bargain reached with the prosecution was acceptable.

Richie made no comment to reporters as she left the courthouse, surrounded by private bodyguards.

Richie’s jail sentence follows that of Paris Hilton, her co-star on the reality TV show “The Simple Life.”

Hilton recently was released after spending about 23 days in custody for violating probation in an alcohol-related reckless driving case.

Reports surfaced Thursday that the reality TV star will do a sit down interview with ABC anchor Diane Sawyer. It reportedly will air next week.

The first of some 12,000 residential tenants and office workers are supposed to move in to the building this month

Photos: World’s Tallest Building Opens

Electrical problems are at least partly to blame for the closure of the Burj Khalifa’s viewing platform – the only part of the half-mile high tower open yet. But a lack of information from the spire’s owner left it unclear whether the rest of the largely empty building – including dozens of elevators meant to whisk visitors to the tower’s more than 160 floors – was affected by the shutdown.

The indefinite closure, which began Sunday, comes as Dubai struggles to revive its international image as a cutting-edge Arab metropolis amid nagging questions about its financial health.

The Persian Gulf city-state had hoped the 2,717-foot (828-meter) Burj Khalifa would be a major tourist draw. Dubai has promoted itself by wowing visitors with over-the-top attractions such as the Burj, which juts like a silvery needle out of the desert and can be seen from miles around.

In recent weeks, thousands of tourists have lined up for the chance to buy tickets for viewing times often days in advance that cost more than $27 apiece. Now many of those would-be visitors, such as Wayne Boyes, a tourist from near Manchester, England, must get back in line for refunds.

“It’s just very disappointing,” said Boyes, 40, who showed up at the Burj’s entrance Monday with a ticket for 천안 안마 an afternoon time slot only to be told the viewing platform was closed. “The tower was one of my main reasons for coming here,” he said.

The precise cause of the $1.5 billion Dubai skyscraper’s temporary shutdown remained unclear.

In a brief statement responding to questions, building owner Emaar Properties blamed the closure on “unexpected high traffic,” but then suggested that electrical problems were also at fault.

“Technical issues with the power supply are being worked on by the main and subcontractors and the public will be informed upon completion,” the company said, adding that it is “committed to the highest quality standards at Burj Khalifa.”

Power was reaching some parts of the building. Strobe lights warning aircraft flashed and a handful of floors were illuminated after nightfall.

Emaar did not say when the observation deck would reopen. Ticket sales agents were accepting bookings starting on Valentine’s Day this Sunday, though one reached by The Associated Press could not confirm the building would reopen then.

Tourists affected by the closure are being offered the chance to rebook or receive refunds.

The shutdown comes at a sensitive time for Dubai. The city-state is facing a slump in tourism – which accounts for nearly a fifth of the local economy – while fending off negative publicity caused by more than $80 billion in debt it is struggling to repay.

Ervin Hladnik-Milharcic, 55, a Slovenian writer planning to visit the city for the first time this month, said he hoped the Burj would reopen soon.

“It was the one thing I really wanted to see,” he said. “The tower was projected as a metaphor for Dubai. So the metaphor should work. There are no excuses.”

Dubai opened the skyscraper on Jan. 4 in a blaze of fireworks televised around the world. The building had been known as the Burj Dubai during more than half a decade of construction, but the name was suddenly changed on opening night to honor the ruler of neighboring Abu Dhabi.

Dubai and Abu Dhabi are two of seven small sheikdoms that comprise the United Arab Emirates. Abu Dhabi hosts the federation’s capital and holds most of the country’s vast oil reserves. It has provided Dubai with $20 billion in emergency cash to help cover its debts.

Questions were raised about the building’s readiness in the months leading up to the January opening.

The opening date had originally been expected in September, but was then pushed back until sometime before the end of 2009. The eventual opening date just after New Year’s was meant to coincide with the anniversary of the Dubai ruler’s ascent to power.

There were signs even that target was ambitious. The final metal and glass panels cladding the building’s exterior were installed only in late September. Early visitors to the observation deck had to peer through floor-to-ceiling windows caked with dust – a sign that cleaning crews had not yet had a chance to scrub them clean.

Work is still ongoing on many of the building’s other floors, including those that will house the first hotel designed by Giorgio Armani that is due to open in March. The building’s base remains largely a construction zone, with entrance restricted to the viewing platform lobby in an adjacent shopping mall.

The first of some 12,000 residential tenants and office workers are supposed to move in to the building this month.

The Burj Khalifa boasts more than 160 stories. The exact number is not known.

The observation deck, which is mostly enclosed but includes an outdoor terrace bordered by guard rails, is located about two-thirds of the way up on the 124th floor. Adult tickets bought in advance cost 100 dirhams, or about $27. Visitors wanting to enter immediately can jump to the front of the line by paying 400 dirhams – about $110 apiece.

Prime Minister Francois Fillon has said the national discussion on France’s identity was “perfectly necessary” and now wants the full government to weigh in on the results

Immigration Minister Eric Besson, who initiated the debate, submitted proposals based on the 350 local meetings held around France since early November.

It was not clear whether any firm steps would be taken after the government meeting. Besson said Friday that several concrete measures on better integrating immigrants can be expected, and that his proposed initiatives also concern fighting discrimination and building a European identity.

French newspapers reported that among the proposals being discussed Monday are a special oath for new French citizens and a “young citizen’s card” for schoolchildren.

The national identity debates often focused on France’s growing immigrant population, and racist comments occasionally popped up on the interactive Immigration Ministry Web site dedicated to the debate, though were quickly removed.

The debate has divided public opinion in France, with some critics claiming it was a ploy by the governing conservative party for more extreme right votes before March regional elections. Numerous intellectuals have opposed it and, minus a few exceptions, 청주 안마 the rival Socialist party refused to participate.

The meetings in towns and cities around France coincided with a debate on whether to ban the face-covering Muslim veil, a subject that overlaps with immigration issues.

Prime Minister Francois Fillon has said the national discussion on France’s identity was “perfectly necessary” and now wants the full government to weigh in on the results.

“Every minister must say what he thinks of the debate and what he thinks of the proposals,” Fillon said last week on Europe-1 radio. They will be called on to “select those which merit being put into place and which justify rules or laws,” he said.

A poll published Feb. 1 by Obea-Infraforces showed that more than one French in two were critical of the debate and nearly 62 percent said it did not help them “define what it is to be French.”

However, Besson justified the debate with another poll, conducted for the Immigration Ministry and made public Friday, that showed that 74 percent of those polled think France’s national identity is weakening, with 30 percent attributing that to immigration and 18 percent to cultural and ethnic issues.

While 75 percent of those polled for the ministry said they were proud or very proud of being French, a full 25 percent were not particularly proud.

The poll for the ministry by the TNS-Sofres firm consulted 1,000 people, the same number as in the previous poll. Margins of error were not provided but in a poll of that size it would be plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Besson wants to continue the debate, perhaps in a different form, through the end of the year.

Haiti Earthquake – Latest CoverageHaiti Quake: How You Can Help Reports started filtering in about tremendous loss of life. It was an unimaginable crisis in a country that long suffered years of poverty, neglect, and corruption. I had been there before when Baby Doc Duvalier and his wife fled the country after years of crippling rule by the DuValier family. Chaos descended on the country then ,forcing US troops to be rushed in to stabilize the country. Now the U.S., along with the world community, would have to come to the rescue again for this most cruel of natural disasters. My bosses at CBS asked me if I would volunteer to go. We were not sure how I would get there. Within an hour I was racing out the door to the Fairfax County Virginia Search and Rescue headquarters. The search team from there is one of the best in the world for earthquake disasters. They have been sent before to far-flung places like China, Taiwan, Turkey, Italy and Mexico to search for survivors in the immediate aftermath of strong quakes. When I arrived at the fire station in Virginia, dozens of men and women with search dogs at their side, were busy packing their equipment and preparing to launch their mission. They travel under the auspices of the U.S. government “AID” program. In this case, the government was desperately trying to find transport to Haiti. I was told we would either have to travel to Dover Air Force base in Delaware for a military transport to Haiti, or we would travel by a civilian charter aircraft from nearby Dulles airport. The search and rescue team was allowing CBS to accompany them on the mission. We were the only journalists to go along. We waited 13 hours through the night until word came we had transportation. I never slept, thinking we could be leaving at any moment. I soon got to know the brave men and women of this very specialized group as we sat all night keeping each other awake. Little did I know that I would remain awake literally for 72 hours, never closing my eyes. Adrenaline kicked in and somehow I kept my wits about me. When we left the airport, we set up our base camp on the ground of the American Embassy, outside of the capital. It was a vast campus of buildings that had withstood the earthquake. Many Haitian-Americans desperately stood outside seeking help. They had walked for miles. Some camped out on the lawns within the compound. Others were there to seek medical help. The lobby of the embassy was set up like a triage center. Patients were being treated by an embassy doctor and staff with limited facilities. But options were few and hospitals were overrun with the injured. These, of course, were the lucky ones that survived. Many others were missing or entombed in the rubble of concrete buildings around the city An advance team from Fairfax county Virginia was sent out with their trained German shepherds to look for signs of life at various locations. Within an hour they came back to the embassy with a positive hit. We raced through the night to an area of Port-au-Prince called Delmas. This is halfway between downtown and the more affluent suburb of Petionville up the mountain. We were going to the collapsed United Nations headquarters building. Along the way, though, we passed literally thousands of people sleeping in the streets. There were no lights and the only way our trucks avoided running the people over was the cinderblocks surrounding the survivors sleeping in the streets. Small branches stuck out of the cinderblocks to indicate there were people there. What I didn’t know until I looked closely was that mixed in with the survivors were the dead covered in white shrouds. The back drop – building after building collapsed like a layer of pancakes. Seven hours later the lone survivor, a 33-year-old Estonian man was extricated from the rubble. Miraculously, he survived with very minor injuries and climbed the few last steps out of the rubble without being held by his rescuers. Those of us on the ground watching clapped and cheered for the man and his heroic rescuers. This was one of the few positive moments for me over the next 14 days. Yet there was no hope for the 100 colleagues left behind in the rubble. My cameraman and I hitched a ride in a pick up truck down the mountainside to get our video back to the satellite feed location. Along the way we saw many corpses lining the streets and chaos everywhere we looked. My colleague had never been to Haiti before. I told him if you took away the collapsed buildings and the bodies in the streets, nothing had changed since my last visit so many years ago. The earthquake just added to the misery already there for decades. CBS was broadcasting from the site of a collapsed bank building on Rue Delmas. Moments before my arrival, Katie Couric arrived to broadcast the news from Haiti that night. I told her about the story of our rescue and we incorporated this into her report that night. That evening we made our way back to our base camp. It was near the Port Au Prince airport. It was a one-story motel called “La Maison.” We theorized it was normally a brothel or room-by-the-hour type of location. It had not been damaged and had a fence around it. We could secure it, as we did eventually, with armed guards with shotguns. Of course, we had food and water trucked in from the Dominican Republic in the coming days and needed protection from the desperate Haitians. I remember when the truck came with MREs (meals ready to eat). The Haitians saw us through the gate off-loading the food and water. That was a mistake. The crowd surged and tried to get in to our compound. I thought we would have to make a run for it. Later we covered the fence with blue tarps so that no one could peer in to see what we had. Each day we covered several stories ranging from rescue operations to assistance operations to get food and water to the masses. I was also assigned to cover the visit of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who came down to Haiti for the day. In this case, it was my job to cover her movements for all five networks. Her visit was limited to the airport, as it would have tied up too many important resources to show her around the city. She met with what was left of the Haitian government, along with the U.N. leadership in this operation. Of course she also met with U.S. military officials leading rescue efforts there. She held a news conference along with Haitian President Rene Preval. Her message to the Haitian people: “America was with the people of Haiti.”. Welcome words to Haitians very distrustful of their own government’s abilities to do anything for the people, given their track record in even the best of times! Afterwards, Clinton granted interviews to each network. The interviewers ranged from Andrea Mitchell of NBC, Kate Snow of ABC, Greta Van Susteren of Fox, Dr Sanjay Gupta of CNN and your’ s truly from CBS. I had traveled with Clinton last summer to India and Thailand and she knows me. Of course, I don’t think she was prepared to see me disheveled like this. The other correspondents traveled with her that morning from Washington and were clean and well dressed. I was filthy, with a beard and dirty clothing . My CBS baseball cap hid my greasy uncombed hair. Without access to running water I had not bathed during my entire time in Haiti. When she extended her hand to shake mine, I said, “Madam Secretary, I wouldn’t recommend that.” She laughed as she looked at me a bit closer. CBS had a variety of correspondents pass through Haiti at this time. Katie Couric and Byron Pitts of “60 Minutes” along with Kelly Cobiella were among the first there. Later, Harry Smith of the “Early Show” was joined by correspondents Seth Doane and Bill Whitaker. All were super to work with and all were moved by what they saw along with the rest of us. At times like this, it is hard to separate your professional responsibilities from your personal feelings of compassion. We all did our best to cover the stories and make people at home understand the need for assistance. We also stepped back and did what we could to help people. One incident left an indelible imprint in my mind. Our correspondent Seth Doane and his producer Chloe Arensberg had done a moving story involving a little boy named Wilson Benoit. He was found by our team and our British security guard Andrew Stephen wandering around while they were shooting a story. While he sat with Wilson, a man from the United Nations World Food Program happened to appear nearby. Andrew approached the man asking for help to get some protection for this little 7-year-old. The man a, a French national, agreed to take young Wilson to a special place that UNICEF had set up for children – a type of safe house to protect them and get them off of the increasingly mean streets of Port-au-Prince. I had not physically seen Wilson until this moment. Raw emotions then hit me as I watched the child being turned over to the man from the United Nations. Here Andrew, the 6’5″ security man, held on to the emaciated body of Wilson. He bid him farewell. I watched from several yards away and my eyes welled up with tears. I told Andrew how impressed I was by what he had done and the concern he showed for the little boy. He told me he just had to do it, thinking of his own two children back home in the north of England. Two weeks had passed and I never let my emotional guard down, but this small act of kindness made me reflect on so many things I had witnessed. This small act of kindness weighed heavily in my mind. There would so many more Wilsons out there, symbolic of the population so devastated by this terrible earthquake. I thought about that for my remaining days in Haiti. When it was my time to leave the country, I was faced with the task of helping to pay our drivers translators. They were very happy to have had a way to earn good money during this time of tragedy. While the money was something they wanted, most begged me for a tent or a generator, or food and water. Those items were something that even cash could not buy at that moment. Their families were sleeping out in the streets, their homes destroyed and their stomachs empty. We did our best to help each and every one of them before we broke down our camp. One of our translators named William helped run a small orphanage. He came with a small truck that we loaded with medical supplies water and food. Much to my surprise many of our Haitian staff came to me with small gifts of thanks. I had not expected this. They were small pieces of Haitian art. One was symbolic of a doorway, metal and wood on a board. Another was a painting of a little Haitian child eating a small piece of mango. Then there were small brightly painted piece of wood, one shaped like a boat. All were touching gestures from people wanting to be gracious even in these difficult circumstances. I do have hope for the Haitian people. They are resilient. They have suffered for decades of hunger, natural disasters and corrupt governments. I’m not so sure that my fellow countrymen could endure the life that these Haitians have been dealt. It will surely be years before Haiti can be rebuilt. I’m convinced, though, it will take the persistence and administration of the outside world to make it work.

청주 안마

It wasn’t immediately clear if this has happened

The spat over the loan has long festered between London and Tehran, and comes against the backdrop of increasingly tense Iranian-British relations.

4 months agoTehran is under heavy pressure from the West over its nuclear program, and has accused Britain and other foreign governments of interference in domestic policies and of stoking the country’s postelection street protests.

The artifact is a 6th century B.C. clay tablet with an account in cuneiform of the conquest of Babylon by Persian King Cyrus the Great. It describes how Cyrus conquered Babylon in 539 B.C. and restored many of the people held captive by the Babylonians to their homelands.

Called the Cyrus Cylinder, it has been described by the U.N. Web site and elsewhere as the world’s oldest human rights document.

According to officials in Iran, the piece was to have been lent to Tehran by Sunday for an exhibition agreed on by the museum and the Iranian government.

Vice President Hamid Baqaei, who is also the head of Iran’s cultural heritage and 대구 마사지 tourism organization, was quoted by state Press TV as saying that the ties would be cut on Monday. It wasn’t immediately clear if this has happened.

Baqaei said the British Museum’s failure to keep its promise is “not acceptable.”

He said the British Museum initially was to lend Tehran the Cyrus Cylinder last September but postponed the deal, citing technical reasons and the postelection unrest following Iran’s disputed June presidential election.

“The Cyrus Cylinder has been turned from a cultural issue into a political one by the British,” Baqaei said, adding that Iran “will sever all its ties with the British Museum, which has become a political institution.”

Baqaei said Iran would send a protest letter the U.N. education agency, UNESCO, over the matter.

The British Museum expressed “great surprise” at the Iranian announcement, saying it had informed Tehran and Baqaei himself earlier this month that the loan would go ahead in the second half of July.

Two additional pieces belonging to the tablet that were only recently discovered in the museum’s possession were also to be lent to Tehran, the museum said in a statement, in line with its policy of cultural exchanges with other nations “independently of political considerations.”

“The British Museum has acted throughout in good faith, and values highly its hitherto good relations with Iran,” it said. “It is to be hoped that this matter can be resolved as soon as possible.”By Associated Press Writer Ali Akbar Dareini; AP Writer Danica Kirka contributed to this report from London